09 Oct

New Clive Cussler Book on Classic Automobiles Available October 25th

Bestselling Author Clive Cussler with his automobile collection Photo G.P. Putnam’s Sons

Bestselling Author Clive Cussler with his automobile collection
Photo G.P. Putnam’s Sons

New York, N.Y. – Clive Cussler, the undisputed master of thriller fiction and author of five New York Times-bestselling series, has long had a passion for classic automobiles: he gravitates toward everything from majestic town cars that conjure up images of evening gowns and tuxedos at elegant soirees to powerful speedsters and sports cars that showcase the cutting-edge technology of their day. Not only are these cars built for the practical use of transportation—they are built for excitement and the insatiable rush one feels when he or she hears the engine’s growl. In short, these cars are built to thrill. In BUILT TO THRILL (G.P. Putnam’s Sons; October 25, 2016; $60.00), Cussler gives readers an exclusive look into his private life and his stunning collection of rare, classic automobiles. Picking up in 1948, where his previous book Built for Adventure left off, BUILT TO THIRLL will excite Cussler fans and car collectors alike.

In striking full-color photographs and engaging commentary, fans of Clive Cussler’s five bestselling series can explore the personal automotive collection of the literary master of mechanical marvels. Readers will explore the unique history of each model and the story of how it was found and restored—not to mention notes on where some of these dazzling machines have appeared in his novels. BUILT TO THRILL captures it all—fins, fenders, and furious horsepower—and runs from the forties through the fifties and sixties.

1951 Daimler “Green Goddess” Drophead Coupe on display at the Cussler Museum in Arvada, CO Photo British V8

1951 Daimler “Green Goddess” Drophead Coupe on display at the Cussler Museum in Arvada, CO
Photo British V8

Highlighting the new book is the 1951 Daimler DE-36 “Green Goddess” Drophead Coupe, which appeared as a concept at the 1948 Earls Court Motor Show that very nearly defied description. Over 20 feet long and almost seven feet wide, built on a limousine chassis, the drophead coupe in the Daimler booth tipped the scales at over 6,000 pounds. Ultimately, the concept’s jade green hue delivered a nickname – the Green Goddess – and a total of seven examples, all bodied by Hooper & Company, were built. Only four of the original seven cars are known to exist, one of which is in Mr. Cussler’s collection. Besides its enormous proportions, the car featured many unique luxury touches for its time including a power convertible top and tonneau cover and four wheel automatic jacking system. Dirk Pitt drove this “Green Goddess” in the book Cyclops.

1952 Meteor Special roadster in the Cussler Collection Photo Forgotten Fiberglass

1952 Meteor Special roadster in the Cussler Collection
Photo Forgotten Fiberglass

The Meteor Special roadster was a specially constructed fiberglass-bodied roadster with a custom frame. It was designed by Dick Jones in Southern California in late 1952; Jones was the archetypical California hot-rodder, designer and engineer. His first Meteor prototype was shown in 1953 at the Petersen Motorama in Los Angeles; it was featured by both Road & Track and Car Craft magazines. Mr. Cussler’s car is powered by a formidable four-carburetor 1952 DeSoto Firedome Hemi and it is very fast. Dirk Pitt drives the Meteor in the novel Trojan Odyssey.

1958 Buick Series 700 Limited Convertible Photo Cussler Museum

1958 Buick Series 700 Limited Convertible
Photo Cussler Museum

The 1958 Buick Limited was the heftiest, highest priced and most opulent monster ever to hit the streets in the fifties. Mr. Cussler’s example, with a Continental kit, stretches 22 feet. It is ostentatious magnificence in the first degree. The Limited was produced for only one year and eight hundred and thirty-nine were built and only about twenty are known to exist today. Visitors to the Clive Cussler Museum in Arvada, Colorado will see the Buick displayed with other gargantuan 50’s convertibles including a 1957 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz, a 1958 Chrysler Imperial and a 1958 Edsel Corsair.. The museum is open between May and September, and ticket and schedule information is available at www.cusslermuseum.com

Clive Cussler has been heralded by fans and reviewers alike for his incredible ability to bring to life real-world feats of engineering, from the inner workings of a train in the early 1900s to the sophisticated submarines of present day. In BUILT TO THRILL, Cussler shares his special affection for classic cars—just like his hero, Dirk Pitt. Car enthusiasts of all ages will enjoy this beautiful and exciting addition to the Clive Cussler canon.

Article courtesy G.P. Putnam’s Sons

30 Dec

Sam Posey Collection takes home Motor Press Guild Award

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Los Angeles, CA– As renowned a career as Sam Posey made for himself as a race car driver, he’s spent far more time as a motorsports observer, albeit a highly qualified one, either as a commentator or writer, and it’s for that latter role that the Motor Press Guild recently honored him with its annual Best Book of the Year award for 2015.

Posey, who raced from 1965 through 1982, began his professional writing career with an article for Road & Track in 1968 and has gone on not only to write for Sports Illustrated and to pen his autobiography, but also to serve as a racing analyst and commentator for ABC Sports throughout the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, covering everything from the Indianapolis 500 to the Olympics to the Iditarod.

Earlier this year, he assembled the best of his varied writings and television scripts for Where the Writer Meets the Road: A Collection of Articles, Broadcast Intros, and Profiles. As the publisher, David Bull, describes the book, “The result is a remarkably varied mix of short and long pieces on subjects ranging from racing in the rain at Le Mans to test-driving the propeller-driven Wind Wagon created by his uncle Teddy in the 1920s.”

The Motor Press Guild presented Posey with the award at its annual awards ceremony earlier this month at the recently reopened Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles.

Sam Posey receiving award from Eric Dahlquist, Sr. (Head Judge – Books, Motor Press Guild)

Sam Posey receiving award from Eric Dahlquist, Sr. (Head Judge – Books, Motor Press Guild)

For more than 40 years, racing fans all over the world have followed Sam Posey’s unique career as a driver, writer, and broadcaster. Posey wrote his first article for Road & Track in 1968, the same year he drove a Chevrolet Camaro for Roger Penske’s team in the Trans-Am series. In the 1970s he not only won at Sebring and finished on the podium at Le Mans, but also published a highly regarded autobiography.

Sam Posey and Tony Adamowicz finished 3rd overall at the 1971 24 Hours of Le Mans driving the N.A.R.T. Ferrari 512M (photo: Speed Merchants Collection)

Sam Posey and Tony Adamowicz finished 3rd overall at the 1971 24 Hours of Le Mans driving the N.A.R.T. Ferrari 512M (photo: Speed Merchants Collection)

Posey retired from driving in 1982, but in the years since then his public profile has grown through his articles for Road & Track, Sports Illustrated, and other publications, as well as his work as a television commentator. In Where the Writer Meets the Road, Posey has selected the best of his work in both fields. The result is a varied mix of short and long pieces as well as examples of the shorter broadcast introductions (he called “teases”) produced for Formula One Grand Prix races at Spa and Monaco, and even non-automotive events like the Iditarod sled race.

Sam Posey in a helmet of his own design, the stripes representing the American flag (photo: David Bull Publishing)

Sam Posey in a helmet of his own design, the stripes representing the American flag (photo: David Bull Publishing)

Sam Posey has had a long association with Connecticut, racing at Lime Rock since he was a teenager under the tutelage of John Fitch which he talks about in the book. In March 2013, the front straightaway at Lime Rock was renamed Sam Posey Straight to honor the driver that enjoyed much success and notoriety at the track. Lime Rock Park track owner Skip Barber commented, “I know – we all know – that Sam deeply loves Lime Rock Park – he grew up five miles from the track. Sam was the first driver to lap the track in less than 60 seconds – that was a big, big deal when Sam did that, in 1967. He was driving a McLaren Can-Am car. And that was just two years after his very first race at Lime Rock, in a Formula Vee, a car that has less than a fifth of the power of that McLaren. Sam was able to use Lime Rock as a launching pad for what turned out to be an astoundingly steep early career path. And of course,” continued Barber, “We’ve been blessed that no less than three of the track’s beautiful buildings, including the now-iconic paddock tower, were designed by Sam”

No matter what the venue or circumstances, Posey’s writing captures the excitement of racing as well as an insider’s understanding of how the sport really works, both on and off the track. It also reflects his innate curiosity and enthusiasm for a wide range of non-automotive interests such as painting, art, design and architecture. The book can be purchased on line at David Bull Publishing www.bullpublishing.com or other on-line book shopping sites.

Article courtesy Hemmings Daily and David Bull Publishing

Sam Posey drove the lime green Dodge Challenger Trans-Am for the Trans-Am series in 1970 (photo: Speed Merchants Collection)

Sam Posey drove the lime green Dodge Challenger Trans-Am for the Trans-Am series in 1970 (photo: Speed Merchants Collection)